Amusements & Entertainment

Tour curated by: The Battle of Baltimore Team

Some Baltimoreans took a reprieve from the monotony of work and housekeeping with trips to the theater, social gatherings at a local dance hall, visits to the museum, or even in the pages of the newspaper.

Locations for Tour

This little Theatre has grown to its present size through many changes, and has been eked by little and little to a respectable establishment; and from the "Mud Theatre" (a name occasioned by its low situation) has obtained the more euphonious…

This handsome edifice was begun in the year 1813, and finished in 1822 by a joint stock company, at the expense of $35,000. The object of its erection was for the accommodation of all the societies under the name of Lodges, belonging to the Masonic…

On August 15, 1814 artist Rembrandt Peale opened his Museum and Gallery of Fine Arts at North Holiday Street in Baltimore, America’s first designed public museum. The museum, designed by Robert Cary Long, was advertised predominately as an arts…

In 1794, Messrs. Wignell and Reinagle appear to have been the prominent theatrical managers in Baltimore, and aided by a subscription they erected a small wooden Theatre in Holliday street. In 1813, this was pulled down, and the present Holliday…

The Dancing Assembly Rooms, with the appropriate suite of apartments, for the second floor, and fronting Fayette street, have been for some time occupied as a dancing academy. Mr. Mallet, a celebrated instructor, has taken a lease of them, where his…

Editor and publisher Hezekiah Niles played an influential role in the Battle of Baltimore: documenting the events for thousands of readers both locally and across the nation. Niles, who came to Baltimore in 1805 to serve as editor of the Evening…

This spring is situated at the corner of East Pratt and Eden streets, and while it affords an equal supply of water with those last named, it far exceeds them in the architectural grace and beauty of its accommodations. In the accompanying plate, we…