Markets, Commerce & Trade

Tour curated by: The Battle of Baltimore Team

As a port city in relative proximity to farmland, Baltimore in the early 19th century was a hub of commercial activity. The city played a significant role in the state's lucrative tobacco trade, with many inspection warehouses along the harbor. Other business was conducted in the city's municipal market system, banks, mills, factories, and custom houses.

Locations for Tour

As the crown jewel of the nation’s oldest continually operating municipal market system, Lexington Market has attracted crowds for more than two centuries. A trio of markets established in 1784 provided early Baltimoreans access to fresh food:…

An ornamental building at the S. W. corner of Howard and German streets, chartered capital of $666,666 66; actual capital $410,000. President Charles Bohn. Cashier, G. T. Dunbar. Discount days, Tuesday and Friday. Excerpted from Charles Varle, A…

Is situate[d] at the south-east intersection of Fayette and North Charles streets. It forms a handsome edifice of the Ionic order. This fine building is decorated with appropriate ornaments, handsomely carved, and has its recessed peristile supported…

The Market in Market space running parallel to Jones's Falls, between Baltimore and Pratt streets, was formerly called Marsh Market but now more generally Centre Market. There are two houses built from Baltimore to Water streets, thence to Pratt…

In the colonial era, English settlers in tidewater Maryland—like their neighbors in Virginia—grew tobacco knowing that Europe had boundless demand for their crop. Growing and harvesting tobacco, however, demanded an enormous amount of…