Monumental Memory

Tour curated by: Baltimore Heritage

Explore monuments to the history of the War of 1812 and the Battle of Baltimore from the famed Battle Monument in downtown Baltimore to little-known markers outside the city.

Locations for Tour

One of the most striking monuments related to the Battle of Baltimore is the nearly 40 foot tall statue of the Greek god Orpheus greeting visitors to Fort McHenry since 1922. Dedicated to Francis Scott Key as well as the Old Defenders, the sculpture…

Overlooking Baltimore Inner Harbor waterfront on Federal Hill stands the statue of Major General Samuel Smith (1752-1839), Revolutionary War officer, merchant, ship-owner, and U.S. Senator earned him the experience and fortitude in the momentous…

On April 25, 1818, Brevet Lt. Colonel George Armistead (1780-1818), age 38, died at the home of his brother-in-law Christopher Hughes, Jr. His funeral procession included the 1814 defenders' of Fort McHenry and citizens who proceeded to Old St.…

The Battle Monument, Baltimore’s official emblem honoring the casualties of Fort McHenry and North Point, is distinguished as America’s first war memorial. 19th century historian John H. Latrobe described the monument “erected by…

On August 14, 1903 at a meeting of the annual Society of War of 1812 in Maryland it was proposed to distribute the War of 1812 cannon described as“…musty and formidable old weapons of war… planted in the streets in different…

Daniel Wells and Henry Gough McComas gained fame as the "boy heroes" of the Battle of Baltimore. Though the historical record may offer slim evidence to confirm their role during the battle, Baltimoreans have celebrated the legend of Wells and…

“Dulici et decorum est pro Patria mori” On July 21, 1817, Captain Benjamin C. Howard’sFirst Mechanical Volunteersformed up early in town and marched six miles to the North Point battleground. Accompanying them were wagons conveying…